Skip to main content

About your Search

20121224
20130101
STATION
CSPAN 4
CNNW 3
CSPAN2 3
FBC 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
CNBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
MSNBCW 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
eye on 2016. okay, when we come back, from energy to education, to technology. our panel's pick for the good news story of the year. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur >> well, just when you thought there wasn't that much to cheer
energy. >> basically we have through technology, the united states has discovered it has a huge amount of both shell oil and shell gas, and it can get it out of the ground. as i say thanks to technology. and that's not just a u.s. story. it is a north american story. there was a ton of oil in canada. there is the same geological formations in mexico. there is a lot of energy that can come upe'. the ceo of flor says there is at least $30 billion of potential c projects around the u.s. gulf of mexico. >> u people say by 2020 we could be self-sufficient in terms of providing most of the oil and the gas we get domestically. what are the implications of this for the larger economy? things like manufacturing and consumer prices? >> certainly obviously residential heating and things like that would be more affordable and make us more competitive and manufacturing and that has to do with exports. we could actually become the leading producer energy for the emerging markets. energy demand in this country is going down, but in the rest of thegy world it is going up. this would be any senator mus
a little win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. >>> hello from new york, i'm chris can hayes heave with richard wolffe and the great heather mcgee, carl smith, the university of north carolina chapel hill, contributor to a blog. and socket sony, the migrant workers advocacy group. the latest gdp provisions looks like the economy may finally genuinely be in a real recovery. it increased by 3.1%. of course, we've been here before many times over the past four years and each time it appears that the economy is going to achieve a philosophy, it gets pulled back to earth. there are two issues. cyclical, how and when we will once achieve full employment and strong growth and structural issues, what aspects do the fundamentals of our country work and not work. barack obama has insisted it won't be enough to cover the downturn and the economy needs fundamental reform and invention. >> i know that we'll have to overcome our doubts and our divisions and we're going t
are free. >> these kinds of smartphone technologies have the potential for a lot of good but the potential for a lot of harm too in terms of embarrassment, unwanted disclosures or discomfort from being tracked. >> reporter: gibson can't get over how easy it was for him and his daughter to be tracked. what's it make you think about? >> if he can find me anybody can. >> reporter: app developers are responding by adding disclosures and written policies which it turns out almost nobody reads. if you read each policy for every website or application you use this year it could take three months of your life. for "cbs this morning," sharyl attkisson, washington. >>> david kirkpatrick is founder and ceo of a media company that focuses on the role of technology in business and society. david, good to see you. >> thanks for having me. >> why does angry birds need to know where we are? >> excellent question and great report. they want to be able to charge more for the ads they sell to their advertisers and it's understandable, but i think that report really points
technology and it is likely toe abused. one of the government agencies that has earned a reputation fot abuse is the obamause administration epa. now suing the epa accusing it o repertory overreaching its efforts to control sentiments build up from a creek in fairfam county.f fox news correspondent now live in washington with the report. >> preventing an enormous amount of development just with this one regulation. >> environmental protectionv agen's's plan to regulate a single break in the commonwealt to cost state and county officials nearly half a billion dollars in a private puppy owners their homes andop businesses. for the department of transportation in fairfax county virginia to control storm waterd runoff on land they don't own. >> what they're going to have to do are things like take people's houses, even to them, knock the houses down and planted grass so the water doesn't flow, if instead soaks into the earth.te >> water, when there's too much of it, can be classified as a pollutant giving the epa broad repertory power under the clean waterat act. they filed a federal lsuit again
that owned millvinia but there would be no way to know for sure. 20 first century technology is what helped unravel -- ten years ago i wouldn't have been able to write this book in the way that it is now. >> any more questions? we have a little time left. i just wanted to say something about the book that made me think, but here in texas, looking at its history, particularly the history of slavery and how texas developed, i didn't know but someone shared with me that there was an incentive to have slaves here in texas among regular people because as the land was given away the mexican government giving of land away was based on how many people were in your group. if you could bring slaves, then you would get more land, regular people brought slaves, especially in texas, lots of working-class people came with slaves in order to enhance, are an interesting test about texas itself. regular people and slavery. we have a little more time. if anyone would like to ask a question. okay. would you please move to the mike. >> when i looked at the first lady's great granddad in the new york times and
technology. they find a myriad of ways to apply it. when they began to apply it, they have to collaborate. at that point it will start to organize itself in ways we cannot imagine. do ise're trying to engineer the world -- a world movement. >> if i can ask you to keep it brief so we can maybe take another one. >> you mentioned that some of these movements have fizzled out. the biggest crisis is climate change. what do you think social movements can do to turn this around and make corporations and governments take action? >> i have been working with 350.org and [inaudible] if youy have -- if you have not checked it out, 350.or. -- org. as we have seen with the last election, the discussion was not about the numbers, it was about the emotional logic. hob it cannot argue with the storm. it will comments masher house. even if you are ann coulter, it will smash your house. this is about internalizing science and making the science become part of the cultural vocabulary. the problem with the right-wing agenda with this huge cloud of disinformation is people are very naive and the arts can help
the director of the national security agency, general alexander, recently spoke at a large technology conference, and he said that with respect to communications from a good guy, which we obviously interpret as law-abiding americans and someone overseas, the head of the national security agency said, and i quote -- "requirements from the fisa court and the attorney general to minimize that to find procedures to protect the individual, the law-abiding americans' rights essentially mean, in the words of general alexander, nobody else can see it unless there is a crime that's been committed. so if people hear that answer to my colleague's question, which frankly general alexander responded to directly, they pretty much say that's what they were hoping to hear, that nobody is going to get access to their communications unless a crime has been committed. the only problem, i would say to my friend, is nor udall and i have found out that's not true. it's simply not true. the privacy protections provided by this minimization approach are not as strong as general alexander made them out to be,
. it was one of the space industry's top accomplishments and one of the top scientific and technological breakthroughs of 2012. some might say 2012 was washington versus the rest of us, stock markets, unemployment, house price all up as lawmakers failed to get their act together. here are the top stories that caught the attention of cnn correspondent christine romans and chief correspondent ali velshi. >> number 10, apple, the first year without steve jobs. they still invent things we didn't know we needed that we would buy faster than anything that's been sold in personal technology than ever before. number nine, the u.s. stock market. despite all those worries about the fiscal cliff and maybe slower growth in the u.s. economy, the stock market has had a great year. too bad you missed out. the smart money's been in the market. the rest of us have been worried about the fiscal cliff. >> number eight, facebook's ipo. hundreds of millions of people like facebook but investors did not on its first day as a public company. trading glitches at the nasdaq and questions about the company's abil
actually did away with coal by having an emissions requirement where there is no technology that will reach it. that will be 1.65 million. the reason i mention these, i could be talking about a lot of different regulations. but if you add up these three regulations, that would be $100 billion in taxes and 3.5 million in terms of the number of people losing their jobs. but the crown jewel of all regulations is to regulate cap and trade. there is a professor at the university, at mit, one of the top guys in the field, and he said regulating co2 is a bureaucrat's dream. if you regulate co2 it would -- the cost would regulate in life. let's look at your state of arkansas and my state of oklahoma. the cost that is regulation, cap and trade, they tried to do it and you remember this, i was on your program talking about this a longtime ago, they tried to do it through legislation. they couldn't do it. and now they are trying to do it through regulation. the cost would be about $400 billion a year. if you take your state of arkansas and my state of oklahoma and do the math, each family that pays, t
with natural gas. and now we have the technology to get it out. but critics argue that it's energy with a very steep price. >> i don't believe that fracking will ever be safe. >> reporter: later on sunday morning, the promise and the perils of fracking. >> osgood: jamie foxx has to be one of the most talented people in american show business. you name it. he does it. byron pitts will get him to show you. >> jamie foxx has made it all the way from the little town of texas to the pinnacle of hollywood. ♪ she knows how to... >> my book will be called "i still pinch myself." >> reporter: he's funny. he can sing. he's an oscar winner. you'll see him later. ♪ ahead on sunday morning >> osgood: as the year 2012 comes to a close this morning, we continue our holiday tradition here at sunday morning. we take time out to remember some of the remarkable people who have left us in the year just pending. >> 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,. ♪ take a load off... >> osgood: they made our hearts sing. they made our spirits soar. >> that's one small step for man. >> osgood: some saved lives, some gave their
been enabled by new technology, in the academic realm, the rise of open access models which need to be embraced rather than in impeded especially since they offer a potential solution to the cost problems in the library sector that tom describes which would not necessarily in this on the economic interests of anyone so we need to think very seriously about how we treat voluntary authorship. by the same token the question remains as to whether or not the account of the ecosystem. i love that terminology, that we have heard today, is in fact the constitutionally correct account. i think i must differ slightly from the account that says the original intent of the framers of the constitution who then turned around the year after and enacted the first copyright act was to give something in balance to all of the participants in the system. as far as i can tell, rightly or wrongly those framers had an instrumental vision of copyright which in fact the end user, the consumer, i am happy to say it again, the reader was the ultimate beneficiary of the system and we may dislike that origina
. >> reporter: in the end, the combination of mom's motivation to find deals and the kids' savvy with technology may be the best combination finding sales. in the end, mom, martha, crushed the teens. she got hundreds off, where they got small dollars off. but i think this just comes down to a motivation issue. they got distracted. they were using their phones to facebook what they bought. yeah. mom, she wanted that deal and she found it. >> she got it. i love this. i didn't know much about this at all. now, i learned a lot, becky. i really did. >> a lot of takeaway. >> a lot of takeaway from that. >> thank you, becky. >> pleasure. >> all right. amy? >>> speaking of deals, 2013 is almost here. we have four perfect looks to ring in the new year in style. "lucky" magazine's lori bergamotto is here. $100 or less. >> there's still bargains to be had, amy. >> we begin with mary. mary's going to come on out. >> this dress is more of a vintage look. you see the tea length. very trendy for right now. we gave her a little thrift store clutch for $5. >> $5? >> go to thrift stores. and shoes from forever 21
could be anywhere, but investigators got lucky because there's a little-known technology built into that photo and it offered investigators a huge break. >> they didn't know that a photograph taken on an iphone and e-mailed to somebody else has gps coordinates on it? >> yeah. >> i didn't know that. >> we were quickly able to check the photograph and check the gps coordinates and then we know exactly where that photograph had been taken. >> investigators rushed to this location in jacksonville. >> how long after you looked at that photograph did you have agents headed to the scene where it was taken? >> minutes. >> but there was no one there. ♪ ♪ >> later that night the kidnappers called back and quinn's mother, again, at the urging of the fbi kept up a tough negotiating stance. >> i want quinn in my car. i'm just warning you. i'm not give young the money until you have quinn in the car. >> i'm telling you what to do. >> i'm telling you what i'm going to do. >> did that aggressive approach seem to work? >> i think so. i really think so. >> another ransom drop was planned. >>
brush movements than manual brushes and even up to 50% more than leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. >>> i'll tell you about an incredible use for fish oil. the extent to which surprised me. every year, about 1.7 million people in the united states suffer traumatic brain injuries. i see it every day in my line of work, in severe cases, i can tell you there is no drug, no pill, really no intervention that can truly help once that damage has set in. what are you about to see, though, is two dramatic cases of crippling brain damage that may have, in fact, been reversed biomega 3 fatty acids. the first case, a 17-year-old in a horrible car accident. his car was overturned, he was discovered almost dead. we pick up the story at the hospital, right after that accident. this was the scene. when his parents finally arrived to bobby's bedside. >> you realize that he could be going any time. >> there had been so much bleeding within the brain. his skull could not contain the swelling. every part of his brain was
, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> good morning and welcome back to "squawk box." here on cnbc. you've got to lost that shot. i'm joe kernen. along with becky quick and andrew ross sorkin. back in we call it ec, englewood cliff, new jersey. i'm in washington with my friend, john harwood. i don't want to pretend there's no bengals, but we are basking. i'm sort of adopting the reskins, rg 3. lawmakers are back at it this morning trying to come to some agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff. senate majority leader harry reid says there's still significant distance between the two sides, but talks are continuing. we'll have more on the fiscal cliff saga in a moment. elsewhere, private equity consortiu
in technology and education and really making sure we don't cut the necessary programs that can help us do that growth and so we have to make them a priority and perhaps deprioritize other spending areas we will be able to grow with the global economy . manufacturing has already come back to some degree i know that apple computers are actually moving a couple production facilities back to the united states from china. there's a real key is to make sure that we're continuing to invest in those types of investments and help us compete on a global scale. but we should also realize that it helps us when apple can produce their goods in china in a more cheap efficient manner than we could here because american consumers can get i pods and i phones on a much discounted basis from what it would be if we tried to do it all here. and so if we don't spend all that money on those i phones here that opens up a whole new industry of productivity. for instance, productivities is something people made a lot more off of in the united states than they would have if we manufactured the devices here so this
's sale. help protect your family with the advanced technology of adt starting at just $99 -- a savings of $300 plus 15% off accessories. but you must call before midnight january 2nd. more than a security system, adt can help let your family in from the cold even when you're away from home. adjust your thermostat remotely to help save energy and money. turn on the lights, even see that everyone is safe and secure. and with adt, you can rely on our fast response monitoring for 24/7 protection against burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide. the adt new year's sale. it could help you save something more important than money. call now to save $300 on adt starting at $99 installed plus 15% off accessories. sale ends midnight january 2nd. >> rick: time for your shot of the morning. a husky that went missing nine months ago in phoenix finally reunited with its owner. a woman found contain more than 1,000 miles away in oregon running near a busy highway. a local humane society tracked down cane's owner by using his identity chip. that is a nice christmas gift if you get your pooch
the right investments in technology and education, making sure we do not cut the necessary programs to do the growth, you have to make that a priority. we will be able to grow with the global economy. manufacturing has already come back to some degree. i know that apple is moving a couple of production facilities back to the united states from china. the real key is making sure that we are continuing to invest in those kinds of investments. we should also realize that apple can produce the goods in china in a more cheap and efficient manner than here. because american consumers can get an ipod or and i from on a much discounted basis from what it would be if we tried to do it all here and if we do not spend money on the iphone sphere, that is a new industry of productivity. something that people have made much more of love in the united states than they would have if they simply manufactured those devices. it is just a question of keeping our workers educated and making sure we have advancements for the future. host: more on the continuing series, this is from "the new york times." host:
protect your family with the advanced technology of adt starting at just $99 -- a savings of $300 plus 15% off accessories. but you must call before midnight january 2nd. more than a security system, adt can help let your family in from the cold even when you're away from home. adjust your thermostat remotely to help save energy and money. turn on the lights, even see that everyone is safe and secure. and with adt, you can rely on our fast response monitoring for 24/7 protection against burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide. the adt new year's sale. it could help you save something more important than money. call now to save $300 on adt starting at $99 installed plus 15% off accessories. sale ends midnight january 2nd. >>> police have arrested a woman in connection with the ambush on firefighters on new year's eve. two firefighters were shot and killed and two other wounded when they arrived to put out a fire at william spengler's house. police say dawn nguyen, the gunman's neighbor, illegally bought the guns used in the ambush. >> the precise charge against dawn nguyen has t
this biometric technology, where they think print individuals -- fingerprint individuals to make sure they're not committing fraud. that is been controversial. host: alisha coleman-jensen -- food insecurity by poverty status, 2011 figures. guest: food insecurity is often related to a lack of economic resources, and we find the prevalence is quite high with household incomes below the federal poverty level. host: another tweet -- corn is wasted on making fuel while people are going hungry. is that part of the problem? guest: i think it is more of an economic issue than a supply issue. we're looking at low income families and resources to purchase the food. host: staten island, new york. caller: i want to not focus on the specifics. i would label many dinos and rinos as cinos, holding to their corporate funders more than people in the state. guest: i have one point to make there. the food stamp program was in the news during the presidential campaign. there was a lot talk about caseloads going up, and the implication was that these caseloads should be cut and that is a bad thing. what we lea
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)